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CSPAN
Jan 17, 2013 11:00pm EST
general come as secretary of education, secretary of homeland security, secretary of health and human services, kathleen sebelius. and we met with a range of 2200 -- 229 groups, representing a wide range of his crewmembers including many from new york, cities and states to gun safety advocates, victims of the shootings both down in virginia as well as in colorado. sportsmen's organization, hunters, gunowners. educators, retailers and public health officials. i spoke to many of the u.s. on as the governors and the county executive and no group is more consequential or incidental in shaping the document was put together for the president in this room. for those of you and other stakeholders after hundreds of hours of work and research done by experts in the justice department and department of homeland security and elsewhere come after every idea what that will make to gather dust on the shelves of some agency of government. a set of principles emerged that there is not universal agreement on, but overwhelming consensus and they were the foundation of the recommendations. if you'll perm
CSPAN
Jan 14, 2013 8:30pm EST
it? how do we deliver band width that can change education, change health care, change all government services, we get faster, cheaper, better, the same phenomenon on our phones and in our networks, we want to see in public goods and services like education and health care. >> host: mr. levin, how important is speed when it comes to improving our economy? >> guest: depends on a variety of different uses. for example in medicine, we're now moving to a place where we can have wireless sensors improve medicine and that's great. but business uses and other thing things, cameras, geneomic medicine, there's faster networks, president clinton was was dell and he said we can't expect our businesses to compete internationally if they only have access the speed of korea, and he is absolutely right. >> reed hundt, energy is included in your book on technology. why? >> guest: to quote the smashing pumpkins, we all know what we're after, we just have to get there faster. we all know we need a clean energy economy, where it's really, really cheap to buy the energy and where the energy th
CSPAN
Jan 15, 2013 8:00pm EST
decade. we are talking about education programs and health programs, including nih research. we are talking about infrastructure. we are talking about key domestic discretionary programs that are so important for the lives of the vast majority of the american people. as the president subsequently yesterday, the debt ceiling essentially must not be used as a weapon. it essentially takes on an is the basic full faith and credit of the united states of america. the president has made so clear what would be at stake if that were to happen. i just believe that it is so critical that that not occurred. you know, i have been through these battles for many decades. i don't remember anyone essentially saying we should go over the cliff. the consequences would be, i think, shamanic and potentially cataclysmic. for the republicans that say let's do it, i think i would be a mistake with foreseeable consequences. the federal reserve has said the responsible physician is we should not forget. >> the president says he's not going to talk about the debt ceiling, speaker boehner said it can be done
CSPAN
Jan 22, 2013 11:00pm EST
increase in funding for education. including full-day kindergarten and we fully fund the teachers pension each of the next two years. [applause] education funding represents 64% of our state expenditures. in addition, we provide $18 million over the next few years to ensure that all hoosier workers have the skills that they need to find a job in today's economy. [applause] since i believe that we need new jobs, we are investing nearly $350 million in excess reserves on indiana's roads and bridges and infrastructure of today and tomorrow. [applause] our budget creates a partnership and because indiana is agriculture, we envision our state becoming a hub of agricultural breakthroughs by supporting the development of an agricultural court order. indiana will continue to lead across the midwest and the world. [applause] our budget also ensures that the indiana economic development corporation is adequately equipped to attract more to the hoosier state and to operate with greater transparency and accountability to the public. [applause] lastly, it was abraham lincoln said that we must
CSPAN
Jan 17, 2013 8:00pm EST
general, secretary of education, secretary of homeland security, secretary of health and human services, and we met with a range of 229 groups. representing a wide ranged perspective, from members of the law enforcement community, including many from your cities and states, to gun safety advocates, victims of the shootings, both down in virginia as well as out in colorado, sportsmens organization. hunters, gun owners, the nra. representatives of the video game and movie destroy. educators, retailers and public health officials. and as i said, i spoke to many of you in this room as well, along with the governors and the county executives. and no group was more consequential or instrumental in shaping of the document we put together for the president, than all of you in this room. to those conversations with you and other stakeholders, after literally hundreds of hours of work and research done by experts at the justice department and the department of homeland security and elsewhere, after reviewing just about every idea that had been written up, only to gather dust on the shelf, of some
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2013 3:00pm EST
appointed you. >> carter appointed me when i left his education, running education. yet in the department of education and i went back to teaching at the appointed me to the commission. >> at what point to become the the u.s. civil rights commission will become a permanent agency? >> after the first year when the reports that they did -- with the commission did was instead of sitting down and saying, okay. we are here as a safety valve and don't really -- they did some hearings. major power that the commission has, and a point this out in the book. to me it is the most important thing about the commission. does what it is supposed to do it will go out and listen to people that nobody else will listen to. problems, civil rights problems that people had that they could not get anyone to pay attention, not just local people but the federal government. it would write letters, do all kinds. no one would pay any attention. the sole rights commission decided that first year it would go out and listen to these people and see what they had to say. they had the power to subpoena anyone.
CSPAN
Jan 18, 2013 6:00am EST
imagination and creativity have crashed. largely -- 90% of the people educated -- that's what i never took a course in english at the university because i feared the deadening effect of the conventional view of literature. i'm glad i did it. i took the examination. >> it worked out pretty well for you. >> exactly. i'm how to write and i have my own idea that i didn't need to listen to the conventional wisdom i already knew was wrong last night. >> i take issue with the idea we have a scientifically -- i don't think we have a scientific illiterate populace but it looks that way because we're the most sophisticated scientific structure organization. the science community in the world over the world has ever seen in this country. and so i agree there is a gap between the professional and the public come and that's a problem but i don't think -- there is a certain amount of illiteracy. all kinds of illiteracy among all populace this large. it's just there's this big difference between us. the question there is -- >> the decline do in both scientific funding, awareness, and ambition for scienti
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2013 11:15am EST
, educated in a certainly they didn't do any such matters manchester is that they are not dedicated under educated matters of the heart. by studying the first lady, for example the first and thomas jefferson did, after spending 13 days and it lost outside of philadelphia bred in the declaration of independence, he went shopping for his wife. he mr. she was preggers. she had a miscarriage and game mastering batterson gloves. then he begged off from serving the rest of the summer so he could go home to monticello to be with his wife. every winter of the revolutionary war, right there besides george washington, suffering through the freezing weather was martha washington with her white on at cannes. so we get new insight on the price and the new insight than others needs. by proposing that book washington's closest adviser with alexander hamilton one of the chapters in the book talks about hamilton's history of womanizing. for example, bill clinton was not the first were the worst when it comes to this behavior in high office. at least this at least this year, armatures maker, john edw
CSPAN
Jan 17, 2013 12:00pm EST
having problems with one of my troops i would try and educate them on some of the information and how a person who's suffering from ptsd might comport themselves in the challenges they would have specifically. by providing that information to the commanders that were ahead of the person in the unit, they were able to understand and maybe take a different factor towards helping the person. >> thank you. >> to have the senior flag officers testify of course and also waiting throughout the morning panel used to have a practice at the commission that the government witnesses would be on the first panel and they object to that inappropriate cases but the reason i'm pointing it out -- i will mention one other thing. the past few times we've invited someone from the department of justice the federal law mandates all federal agencies shall cooperate fully with the commission. they won't send to testify at any time in the past couple of years. so it kind of the allies at least one false myth and that is that the military doesn't take this issue very seriously. so after trying to compliment you,
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2013 7:00am EST
, and he taught us to value education. he taught us that here in this country we wouldn't go far if we didn't have an education so he taught me to dream a lot of dreams that i don't know if i would have dreamed op my own. i'm grateful to my father for, you know, encouraging me to dream big, and he would always say, you know, just because we're undocumented tennessee doesn't mean that we cannot dream. >> host: so what's your relationship with your mother? what was your relationship? >> well, my mother, she was, you know, very good mother up until the point when she took off to come here to the u.s.. when she came here here, her experienced changed her a lot. she did not have a good experience in the u.s.. my father left her for another woman, and when she came back to mexico, she was very bitter and broken hearted about the whole experience, and she changed, too, as a mother. she was no longer interested in being our mother. she was more interested in finding someone to heal her broken heart. i lost my mother when she came here because the woman who came back to me was not the same o
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2013 7:15pm EST
, but an educational book about how they might talk to their kids about a difficult subject with him i don't run into. so that's where the format is an illustrated picture book for kids. as i got into the subject and started looking into train, which is relevant to some children's lives. their children but pickett, families involved in the oppressive policies to eradicate coca and it's a social or cultural issue. as i got deeper into the history of coca and specifically with relationships of the coca-cola company, origins from a medical marvel to the drug problem we have today, it got really complicated and so now it's a book for adults. i also started in coca with coffee because they wanted to do a comparison is not in that fascinated me with the way the drugs, plants change their perceptions over time for the cultural perceptions, the legal, social perceptions. as inspired by michael collins spoke about body of desire, where he talks about the history for different plants. when apples came to this country, they want the fleshy fruit we all know today, but were used for fermentation p
CSPAN
Jan 23, 2013 9:00am EST
education, it is great, i can tell you that. we raise her family and a century-old farmhouse in the yakima valley. i'd also like you to meet my three boys and their families, connor, joe, jack and his wife megan, our grandson brody, and the newest inslee, zoe ann. [applause] this is a very special day for my family. all of our elected families. and this is a very special time for many other families in our state for this reason. people all across washington stood up for fairness and family in approving marriage equality last november. we should all be proud. [applause] we should all be proud. the vote on referendum 74 represents the best of who we are as a state. it should be an inspiration for the progress we can make, always towards equality, always towards fairness, always towards justice all across the state of washington. it has been an amazing journey over the past year and a half, as i've traveled to all corners of the state. i am a 5th generation son of the state of washington, and am proud to have roots in this state that are as wide as they are deep. my family came to this state
CSPAN
Jan 23, 2013 7:00am EST
the holocaust educational trust? >> i think my honorable friend speaks for the whole house and a developed country and raising his find -- final issue and praising the holocaust education trust. absolutely brilliant organization that make sure young people from schools across our country get the opportunity to go and see the places where the terrible events of the holocaust took place. i had privileges we could meeting with a survivor whose story was truly heroic and truly heartbreaking. but who in her 90s is still making these arguments in making this case so that future generations will and. we should also learn not just about the european holocaust but what has happened recently in rwanda, in bosnia, in cambodia and elsewhere that tragically there is far too much prejudice in our world. >> ed miliband. [shouting] >> mr. speaker, can i join the prime minister in thing to be to kingsman david robert shaw of first battalion the duke of lancaster's regiment. each of the utmost courage and bravery and the condolences of the whole house go to his family and friends. >> here, here. >
CSPAN
Jan 16, 2013 5:00pm EST
we see. okay mr. willard? >> i would offer the question of education and trains as a potential lesson here is an excellent one. it is one of the significant lessons from fukushima. we frankly find that there very often training lessons learned from any number of occurrences throughout industry. in this particular case, when you think about the magnitude of the event and the situation that the operators at this particular nuclear site found themselves in, it was unpress kented in any of the education and training. i think one of the hess sons is to take that idea of a mag feud event that exceeds what we general design in to our sites and going both educate what defense and depth can really provide and train to the coping strategies in a situation like that that would be, you know, that may allow the level of resilience that may not have been designed in to site in the first place. it's just, you know, this was remarkable in the scope there were courageous operators that remain at the watch at the fukushima attempting to mitigate what happened to them. obviously, in retrospect ad
CSPAN
Jan 22, 2013 7:00am EST
educational goals, college or graduate school, in light of runaway tuition. >> yes. >> is that right? okay. do you want -- >> and also -- [inaudible] >> right. >> i mean, how are we going to get the doctors if tuition is 70 grand a year? >> we write in the booking about how -- in the book about how hard it is for homeless kids in the cities in which they live today just get through high school. the challenge that so many kids confront, and liz murray wrote, you know, a beautiful memoir, "breaking night," about her journey from homelessness to harvard, how are we going to create opportunities for kids whose families won't or can't take care of them who have been told over and over again you're broken because they're poor or their parents hate them or reject them because they're gay or lesbian. these kids feel so damaged that college feels like another planet to them. and we write in the book about the game changing things that cities and nonprofits are doing to create high schools that are connected to homeless youth centers. there's a great program here in the city that's part of or
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2013 7:30am EST
adulation the world held -- unless everyone here is aware that august educational institute not too far from here, i mean bard college, there's actually an alger hiss chair inhumanities. my colleague, hilton kramer, the founding editor, had an honorary degree from bard when this new chair inhumanities was pronounced. he probably gave it back to the president. well, i'm delighted to welcome you to our final panel commemorating the 60th anniversary of whittaker chambers "witness." and i think we saved the most difficult or at least the most contentious question for last. what defines conservatives tod today? i think in the context of "witness" and the work of bill buckley, today means after the cold war. he said a little bit about that already this afternoon. but i'd like to say a little more about it, little more succinct way about it now. so after the cold war, that means after the implacable confrontation of communism by the evil empire, the soviet union and the west. in his preparatory letter to his children are which has been mentioned already, chambers said that in communism he
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2013 3:00pm EST
educated population, um, that would have some political power. now, i am not suggesting that this is a conspiracy by any means. this was simply people of like mind in their social clubs and in their, the circles that today operated in -- that they operated in acting in what they perceived as their self-interest. and, you know, for some of them probably they thought this was the best thing for the country. these men represented really disparate interests and, for the most part, they were technocrats. they viewed the world through this urban lens. some of them had grown up on farms, didn't think much of the idea. their definition of reforming agriculture meant substituting capital for farm labor and replacing small farms with large, vertically-integrated ones that could supply the food companies with the raw ingredients that they needed. so the ced and the business interests that they represented lobbied against the new deal farm programs, and they began to really successfully start chipping away at them in the 1950s during the eisenhower administration. in 1962 the ced published a rep
CSPAN
Jan 19, 2013 7:00pm EST
go back to the farm and have an educated population that would have some political power. now, i am not suggesting that this is a conspiracy by any means. this is simply people, the surplus that they operated in. what they perceived as self-interest. it is something that they probably thought were the best thing for the country. these men represented this interest and for the most part, they view the world through an urban lens. some of them grew up on a farm. replacing small farms with integrated ones that could supply the food companies with the raw ingredients that they needed. so the cdc lobbied against the new deal farm programs and they began to really successfully start chipping away at them in the 1950s during the eisenhower administration. in 1962, the cd published a report that was prepared by 50 influential business leaders and 18 economists from leading universities. it was called an adaptive program for agriculture, and it laid out his plan to drastically reduce the number of farmers and to create this large labor pool. and it would be accomplished by getting these boys
CSPAN
Jan 18, 2013 9:00am EST
engaged more on financial reform, to educate themselves better, make an issue with their elected officials. i have some policy recommendations at the end of the. i hope people will look at this recent. >> the former head of the fdic, sheila bair on the government's role during the country's worst financial crisis since the depression. her book is "bull by the horns." sunday night at eight on c-span's q&a. >> next comic kansas governor sam brownback delivers his third state of the state address. in his remarks before the joint session of the house and senate, he gave his plans for balancing the state budget which faces a projected shortfall of $267 million for the fiscal year beginning july 1. this event in topeka is 25 minutes. >> good evening. mr. speaker, madam president, -- [applause] you jumped my laundry now going to have to repeat. you will have to do that again, i hope. i was just looking at her thinking there's a lot of new faces here. welcome. good to have you in the legislature. it's going to be a great you and they do have before i get started one quick big announcemen
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2013 3:30pm EST
programs. science, technology, engineering, mathematics education programs. 209 of those. surface transportation, 100 plus. picture quality, 82 programs. economic development 88. transportation assistance, 80 financial literacy among 56 different programs, job training forty-seven different job training programs. homelessness and the prevention, assistance, plenty programs. food for the hundred and 18. disaster response prepared this cannot be met, 17 different programs. >> well, it is not just a land is that we have that many programs. what is also outlandish as we don't know if they're working because when they are passed there is nothing that says you have to have a metric to see if it is accomplishing the goal. in the base defect of the congress since i have been here has been the total lack of oversight of most of the programs. >> you recount in the book a story about taking an amendment to the senate floor to get rid of some of these duplication programs, duplicative programs. what happened? why did it pass? >> we had one for $2 million pass but all the rest of failed. >> wh
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2013 10:15am EST
development and in education and stuff, as had the sputnik launch in the 1957. it may have been to a younger generation it may have been too diffuse, because sputnik is probably not as big a thing as it is to an older generation, but that was pretty clever. but most of his slogans, most of his abilities so far have not, have not really caught on. the first summer he was in washington he said, and it's a strange construct, but he said in august he said this is the time when washington becomes all wee weed up and things are hard to get done. no one really knows what it means, but it's somehow applicable. [laughter] so on that low note, i think i'm going to see if you guys have any questions and want to talk about these things. yes, ma'am. >> i'm surprised that you didn't mention the president that we popularly think are the most eloquent; ronald reagan and john f. kennedy. were they just good at regular words, or did they -- >> oh, no, they had, i mean, john f. kennedy had wonderful phrases, and the new frontier was his. but they were more or eloquent in sense of their ability to give
CSPAN
Jan 19, 2013 4:00pm EST
men in the pillbox. remarkably a lieutenant was educated in the united states and he said basically i am ready to surrender. lieutenant edlund said to him to the commander of the fort -- take me to the commander of the fort and that is what he did. with his tiny gun and a fabulous four when trudy locris battery, down an elevator, through an amphitheater that looked like a football field and they went into the depths of this guns and -- guns of navarrone type situation and went to the commanding officer's office. edlund decided to break through the board. at that point of the commanding officer looked at him and said what do you want? he said we would like you to surrender the fort. the commanding officer was incredulous. you are only four men. he picked up the steel telephone. you are my prisoner. at that point robert edlund proudly had one of the greatest moves of world war ii. he pulled out a hand grenade and put it between his legs and said you are going to surrender the locris battery. 800 men from the locris battery surrendered after he broadcast that over the loudspeaker. incred
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2013 8:00pm EST
cooling goes and how they keep that oil -- getting makerbot is educational and how things are made in the manufacturing process and in the world around us. you can play me. >> host: where did you come up with the idea of? >> guest: 3-d printers have been around for 25 years but they were mainframe sized machines that were really expensive. i wanted one that i couldn't afford one. so some friends and i got together and we started tinkering. when it worked we quit our jobs and started makerbot so everybody could have one of these. >> host: bre pettis is the founder of makerbot in the ceo of the makerbot corporation out of brooklyn new york one of the hottest products here on the floor of ces. you have been watching "the communicators" on c-span
CSPAN
Jan 23, 2013 5:00pm EST
how to educate, train and develop leaders for the future. we are witnessing examples of increasing afghan national security force capabilities. i'll give you just one example. in november, the afghan berean corps successfully connected level operations across regional command south. these operations included all security element, police, army and afghan plan come afghan led the logistically supported by afghan forces. this is plan and conduct game the supply and separate resupply missions conducted by emerging afghan air force using helicopters. the afghan organizations demonstrate independently security force that assistance will focus at the next organizational level. while this supports a smaller footprint, it is not simply about doing life. this is about putting our advising and enabling resources in the right places at the right levels within the afghan national security force to ensure that afghan partners can hold the gains of the past. this is about the right mix this capabilities to security while continuing to support the afghan national security forces as they grow in ca
CSPAN
Jan 19, 2013 10:00pm EST
board of education decision. there was the killing of the civil rights workers. it was people like barbara jones, the young high school student who led a walkout of the segregated schools to protest against the inferior education. that's in 1951. many people we don't even know their names oregon before rosa parks in montgomery. there were two other teenagers who did the same thing. so this resistance largely among young people. >> host: always among the young. >> guest: when we talk about south africa it was the students and saleh though. we all remember nelson mandela. nelson mandela was in a prison. it was the students stephen eco-who revived a movement in the early 70's and late 60's. >> host: there was james sybil talking about children the young people leading the way. he did something that got a lot of criticism for him and for dr. king. tell the story about the children's movement. >> guest: again, king was at a crucial point. we have the image the king gave the direction and he had a margin people across the country followed him. that is wrong. from montgomery which king di
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2013 9:00pm EST
things did. it was his death, it was the brown v. board of education decision. as people like barbara johns, the high school student that led a walkout of the segregated school because of protesting in the interior education. that's in 1951 we don't even know their names anymore even with rosa parks and montgomery. there were two other teenagers who did the same thing. as of this resistance, largely among the young people. >> host: on both sides is and it? >> guest: definitely. when you talk about south africa we all remember nelson mandela it was the students and others that revised the movement that was more abundant in the late 60's. >> host: he did something that got a lot of criticism for him and dr. king. tell that story about the crusade. >> guest: he was at a crucial point in birmingham. he gave a direction in march and millions of people followed him, completely wrong. from montgomery which came didn't initiate through birmingham, king is a leader but only in birmingham can he initiate and sustain the movement but that point in april of 1963 all of the people that are
CSPAN
Jan 15, 2013 5:00pm EST
close to have been the next decade. and so, we are talking about education programs. were talking about health programs, including nih research. were talking about infrastructure. we're talking that key domestic discretionary programs that are so important for the lives of the vast majority of the american people. so let me just say two things about that. number one, there has to be a balance. and number two, i think it is fido, as the president said so clearly yesterday, that the debt ceiling essentially must not use to say what then that essentially takes on and essentially undoes the basic full faith and credit of the united states of america. the president made so clear what would he have staked if that were to happen and i just think it's so critical that not occur. you know, i've been through these battles as i've said for many decades, but i don't remember anyone essentially saying we should go over the cliff in terms of the full faith and credit of the united states. the consequences with teeth, i think, to not take, potentially cataclysmic. and for the republicans who essential
CSPAN
Jan 16, 2013 12:00pm EST
across the country have access to affordable housing and quality education. senator schumer invited him to open the luncheon with a prayer in recognition of his long history of service. >> and i would, if i would just really quick, um, this doesn't speak specifically to the hispanic-american community, but, um, in shuffling my notes i did miss the fact we wanted to make sure that everyone knew that merely evers williams who is the widow of med garre evers will also be doing the invocations to the official event. and, again, this really ties into the fact that this is an event that looks back at the history of our country as well as forward to where the president wants to take us as a country. so we think that'll be a very nice way to open the event and a nice nod towards the civil rights movement and the part it's played not only in the president's life, but also in the country's life. >> with why don't we go to this side over here. sir? >> [inaudible] just want to know -- [inaudible] coming, and if there is a list for us and why don't we see that. [inaudible conversations] >> forei
CSPAN
Jan 22, 2013 12:00pm EST
serve throughout his career. work on issues from education and transporation to civil rights and national service advanced the causes of the party immeasurably. please join me in thanking our retiring officers. they have done a remarkable service for the entire country. [applause] now let me introduce our slate of new dnc officers. they are a talented, dedicated and passionate group of people who will strengthen and energize our party. marina alana, with your support today, serve as vice chair of the dnc. maria's work as executive treasurer of the los angeles county federation of labor and years of service as president of the tier local 11 # reaffirm our party's steadfast commitment to american workers. she'll strengthen the bond between the dnc and brothers and sisters in the labor movement. my friends, congresswoman of hawaii, with your support today, will also serve as vice chair. she's the first american indue member of congress, and along with the congresswoman of illinois, one of the first female combat veterans to serve in congress. [applause] the story is an inspiration a
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2013 4:00pm EST
education, has generally been supportive of these value added numbers, after the data was published, the obama administration has provided financial incentives for states to provide value add educators for paying and promoting teachers. proopinion anyones point out they're a huge potential improvement over systems in which all teaches are paid in a system -- many experts warn these assessments have large margins of error and can deliver misleading results. the union representing the new york city teachers spent more than $100,000 on a up in advertising campaign, built around the headline, this is no way to rate a teacher. opponents argue the value added assessment creates a false impression used by parents and public officials who do not understand the limitations of of this. everybody is right up to a point. a man works extensively with value added data for teachers, warns that these are inharen day noisy. the results are based on a single test, taken on a single day, by a single group of students. all kinds of factors can lead to random fluctuations, anything from a particularly d
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2013 5:00pm EST
training programs exist to educate judges about precedence over national law? is very national mechanism to promote de facto equality? if so, does it promote measures in developing policies? chemical professionals initiate lawsuits? if so, how many cases have been filed? at their quotas, targets or goals? if so, what are they? does the machinery attacked budget expenditures? for% is spent on women's programs, social issues, family programs? or their quotas, targets, specifics? et cetera, et cetera. to gender quotas exist for increasing women elected to government bodies? at a public education programs conducted by the state to emphasize the importance of balance representation in all elected bodies and so on? i condemned they are not universal human rights. they have little to do with equality of opportunity. they're they are essentially a partisan political positions of western progressives of the western left. come off as universal human rights. in the u.n. monitoring committee to france in 2000 make company said you're doing a good job unpolitical pairing. 50% of candidates for municipal
CSPAN
Jan 19, 2013 7:00am EST
children and six educators in newtown. that incident still is incomprehensible to most of us. too many times during the last year mayors have expressed shock at a mass shooting and even more frequently we must cope with gun violence that occurs on the streets of our own cities. the u.s. conference of mayors has been calling for sensible gun laws to protect the public for more than 40 years. it's not a new issue for us. may or yours and police chiefs from cities of all sizes have worked together in this effort over the years. in an open letter to the president and the congress sent just three days after the newtown tragedy occurred, the conference of mayors sent a statement urging immediate action. now more than 200 mayors have signed on to the letter, and we are calling on our president to exercise his powers through either executive order or action of the congress to introduce and pass legislation to make reasonable changes in our gun laws and regulations. specifically, we called on congress to enact legislation to ban assault-style weapons and high capacity magazines. we asked them t
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2013 6:00pm EST
about the military education, the acceptance that has to go down but he feels uneasy about the constitution and some of the causes and he's already beginning to look at the session the and he certainly is in january before and he says in his letter not a moral point of view but the implication of savages from africa making slaves of them would be the best we could do for them but the question as political bearings virginia and north carolina from the sleeves of the market and the value of the property of the confederacy were such importations prohibited would be more than it would be in the southern confederacy which would admit of no such competition and we already have the plotting for the secession before he's there. estimate i don't think the secession could ever have been actually. estimate your absolutely right it's not going to change what we agree on and that is they would not have accepted anyone but a proslavery democrat at that moment. they didn't even accept the popular democrat. stephen douglass to simply says they could vote in the territory to exclude slavery wit
CSPAN
Jan 19, 2013 6:00pm EST
-meaning, gracious man. he's an educated man as well, a cultured man. c-span: is it hard for a reporter to cover a story or an individual when they don't agree with them and be fair? >> guest: you see, i'm one of these people who doesn't say that objectivity is not within our reach. i think if you're a pro and you're a reporter, you do it. whether you agree with the guy or not is just quite incidental it doesn't count at all really. c-span: what did you leave out of this book? >> guest: what did i leave out? a hundred pages that they made me edit out. it was a hundred pages longer, and you probably want to know what was in those hundred pages. c-span: in about a half of minute. >> guest: oh dear! that's a hard one. i think there was probably a lot more on the release of the pueblo crew, more about covering affairs in europe and in the middle east. there was certainly more about my father that unfortunately i had to cut, and more about the history of new haven and the italian migration and that kind of thing. c-span: what's the next book about? >> guest: i don't know. i think it's going
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2013 7:30pm EST
if this country moved in a direction to make education less affordable. so we as a university are very dependent and concerned about the fiscal health of this country. >> host: amy gutmann, are you also in the classroom at the university? >> guest: i enjoy teaching and take every opportunity to meet with students, talk to students and teacher my spare time. >> host: what does a provost do and how library at princeton? >> guest: i was at princeton for 28 years of the time i got my phd to the time i came to pan and was dean of the faculty at princeton and the chief academic and financial officer at princeton or the progress works closely with the president. >> host: with the learning curve on being president of the university? >> guest: well, the learning curve is steep for anybody and it's also very exciting. >> host: gives a primer. just go the university of pennsylvania had 10,000 undergraduates and 10 dozen graduate students. we have about 4500 faculty members. we ran three hospitals and we have a great school of medicine as well as a great school of arts and sciences. we have 3
CSPAN
Jan 19, 2013 9:00am EST
remarkable gift with difficult children. she not only has her or ph.d. in special education, but she's a traditional disciplinarian, tough love. so they contact the nun, and the nun is kind enough to come over to their house in exchange for a small donation for the church, and sits down. she wants to sit down with the kids one at a time. so she sits down with kid number one, the 10-year-old. and she's got her steel ruler in her hand, and she says ever so gently just the simplest question she can think of. son, where is god? and the little boy sits there and doesn't say a word. so she gets a little less patient, and she says a little more sternly, son, where is god? and the little kid still doesn't answer. so she taps her palm with the steel ruler and comes out with that kind of controlled fury that has taken command of kids from the south bronx to compton, california, and she says, son, i'm asking you, where is god? and the kid runs away and hides in a closet. now, his little brother knows this is the closet where they usually plan strange things like the next garage to burn and
CSPAN
Jan 15, 2013 12:00pm EST
." we propose a number of different ways in which we could use technology to improve education, health care and government performance. so if you didn't get a copy when you came in, there are copies out in the hallway outside the auditorium. in this particular session, we're going to discuss how our political leaderrers can better -- leaders can better address the problems that we face. in particular we're going to look at ways that we can get congress, the white house and federal agencies to perform at a higher level. what are the new ideas to change the manner in which government functions? are there responsibilities that can be foreverred to other levels of -- transferred to other levels of government, the private sector or nongovernmental organizations? to help us understand the benefits and barriers to government performance, we have brought together an outstanding set of speakers. to my immediate right is phil knight who's the chairman and cofounder of nike incorp.ed. -- incorporated. in 1964 phil and his former university of oregon track coach, bill bowerman, founded what was th
CSPAN
Jan 22, 2013 8:00am EST
for smarter, locally targeted investments in infrastructure. we say that training and education must be expanded to build the workforce we need for a 21st century global economy. and we call for an expanded focus on ports, exports and advanced manufacturing to great more jobs in america and reduce our trade imbalance. on all of these issues we took aggressive action. our conference of mayors engage direct with the obama administration and congress through every step of fiscal cliff negotiations. at the national press club on september 15, we released a letter to vice president scott smith, our second vice president kevin johnson and i drafted, 131 of our mayors sign, calling on congress to adopt a bipartisan and balanced approach deficit reduction by incorporating spending cuts with additional revenue. we took the same message to both political conventions and to the presidential debate where mayors of both parties were active and visible participants, speaking for commonsense solutions to the pending fiscal crisis. in just one week after the election, our leadership came to washingt
CSPAN
Jan 16, 2013 7:30am EST
. he has a deep and long-standing commitment for education, and i know he recently took time out to do a town hall meeting for k-12 teachers. and so i'm particularly please today that joining us in the audience is an advanced placement economics class from chelsea high school. a special welcome to you. we're delighted to have you with us. a word about our format. for the first portion of our time, dr. bernanke will join me here on the stage in a conversation about a number of economic issues. for the rest of the time he has graciously agreed to take questions from the audience. and so around 4:30 our staff will be coming through the aisle to collect question cards from you. those of you who are watching online or even those of you in the audience are welcome to tweet your questions to us as well, using #fordschoolbernanke. professors kathryn dominguez and justin wolfers will collect question, along with two of our graduate students, david allen and curtis smith. and now it is my great pleasure and honor to welcome to the stage chairman ben bernanke. [applause] >> susan, before we get s
CSPAN
Jan 17, 2013 6:00am EST
across the country b have access to affordable housing and quality education. senator schumer invited him to open the luncheon with a prayer in recognition of his, you know, long history of service. >> and i would, and if i would just really quick, um, this doesn't speak specifically to the hispanic-american community, but in shuffling my shot notes i -- shuffling my notes i did miss the fact we wanted to make sure everyone knew that merely evers williams who is the widow of slain civil rights leader med garre can evers will also be kicking it off. and this ties into the fact that this is an event that looks back at the history of our country as well as forward where the president wants to take the country, so we think that'll be a nice nod towards the civil rights movement and the part it's played not only in the president's life, but also in the country's life. >> why don't we go to this side over here. sir? >> my name is -- [inaudible] and i just want to know how many foreign dignitaries are coming and if there is a list for us and when will we see that? >> foreign dignitar
CSPAN
Jan 17, 2013 9:00am EST
multiple levels of professional military education across our force. to include training for men and women who are about to consume -- assumed command answered a key leader and noncommissioned officer position. victim care a central to our approach. we implemented new policy that provides victims the option for expedite transfer from the command of based to a different location. we've established a certification program for sexual assault victim advocates and withstand the dod self-help line to help transitioning servicemembers who have experienced sexual so. as i conclude i want the commission do now that i've not come here today to minimize the problem of sexual assault in the military. we recognize we have a serious problem, and we will continue to confront the brutal realities of this problem and remain persistent in all our efforts until we eliminate sexual assault. i have detailed the specifics in some of the other programs initiatives in my submitted written statement. i thank you for your attention, look forward to your questions. >> thank you, general. >> members of the comm
CSPAN
Jan 15, 2013 9:00am EST
require a full education. so that gets us how do we deal with educational site. i do want to go into that. then you come to the question of how do you come how do we make a more effective and priority. i don't know how it happened, but we stuck with the history stuck with a history in a is that was very excellent education. and we. and were regarded as everybody basically is back to the ford model. you have kindergarten through 12, then you go to college, and if you haven't achieved that you are really worthless, right? so that's not working. i think we have to go back to origin and say let's make it more flexible and let's also bring -- you asked early on where is opportunity. i think that is the most natural opportunity for cooperation to, in fact, it's happening already. we have a number of programs on the way they successfully. there's a big challenge there, and that is a challenge that most people today that goes when education system don't even understand what a manufacturing job looks like. the image that they have been manufactured you is you come in early in the month w
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2013 12:30pm EST
in our education and how it has prepared us as women and the leaders and the fact that your mom was very much an activist in the movement, and they need to know about it. i'm working on the book, this book. i said well, can i help you, can i get it published and that is how this journey began. >> bernice, when did your mother began her activism? she was born in marion alabama? >> i ron ackley if you study history, three of the leading movement, ralph abernathy and my father all have lives in alabama. how ironic is that. my mother didn't know one leader after that. she no one was much younger but they didn't know, you know, that kind of stuff and it just brought it all together. and so, growing up there in rural alabama with a father who was an entrepreneur early on and he called lumber and he did open an assault mel by a white gentleman. the father's determination to stand up to justice and continue to move to really influenced her and that produced a lot of the leaders in the nation. missionaries came and educated the reactive and why am i here driven by the fact they got to colleg
CSPAN
Jan 22, 2013 12:30am EST
grounded in faith that our education and how it prepared us as women to be leaders and the fact that your mom was very much an activist involved in the peace movement and they need to know about her. and i said i'm working on this book. i said can i help you? get it published? this is how the journey began. >> host: bernice king your mother come to how active bushy and when did she begin her activism? was born in marion alabama? >> guest: ironically if you study history three of the leading persons in the movement ralph abernathy and my father i'll had wives from carrie county alabama. how ironic is that and mom did not know of one data abernathy. when the movement started they didn't know about them marrying different men in all of that kind of stuff and have brought it all together. and so growing up there in rural alabama with the father who was an entrepreneur or entrepreneur or leon and unheard of as an african-american had his own truck. he hauled lumber. he did open a sawmill and it was burned down by a white gentleman he hired. he would not let that stop them. implements a separat
CSPAN
Jan 17, 2013 5:00pm EST
in this country. we have a highly educated and motivated work force that in many respects outperforms, not out educated about from a point of view workers in virtually every effort country. we have the most efficient capital markets in the world. our companies have the lowest cost of capital of any companies anywhere around the globe. we have a spirit of entrepreneurship and innovation and capitalist system and commitment to a capitalist system that is the envy of virtually every other country in the world, and we also have increasingly as elude it to in the earlier panel have always had a very strong natural resources, but with shale oil and gas and the incredible strength of our agricultural industry we have a great natural resources as well so there's a lot to be bullish about in this country in terms of our economic opportunities, but this fiscal deficit, our fiscal policy is an enormous cloud on us reaching that potential and i work on the investment banking industry i used to be in the money-management industry. there is a phrase that sometimes gets applied to compan
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2013 12:00am EST
change your spark anything with the civil rights movement? >> his death, brown vs. board of education decision killing of civil-rights workers, the young high-school student who led a walkout to protest against fifth inferior education. 1951. many people we don't even know there names or other teenagers who did the same thing. so the resistance largely among young people. >> definitely when you talk about south africa, we all remember nelson mandela who was in a prison cell. for others to revived a movement in the early '70s and the late '60s. >> host: talking about children, james did something that got a lot of criticism for him and dr. king. >> guest: king was at a crucial point* in birmingham with millions of people across the country followed him. from montgomery which king did not initiate, through birmingham, king is a leader in search of a following. only in birmingham can he initiate and sustain a movement the dow reached a crucial point* in 1963 all those who were adults who were willing to get arrested already had been arrested. he writes his letter from the birmingham jail
CSPAN
Jan 16, 2013 8:00pm EST
access to affordable housing and quality education and senator schumer invited him to open the luncheon with lunch prayer in recognition of his long history of service. >> just really quick, to speak to the hispanic american community but in shuffling my notes i did miss the fact we wanted to make sure that everyone knew that merely evans williams who is the widow of medgar evers will also be doing the invocation and kicking it off and again this ties into the fact that this is an event that looks back at our history as a country to where the president wants to take us as a country. we think that will be a very nice way to open the event and towards the civil rights movement and part of not only the president's life but also the country's life. >> i just wanted to know how many people are coming and. [inaudible] >> from our standpoint i believe we are still finalizing the list of individuals who will attend and we will have more information on that in the coming days. traditionally the diplomatic corps has been seated upon the platform and there are 1600 guests that are seated
CSPAN
Jan 16, 2013 9:00am EST
-tech, various kinds of service, health care, education and so on. and places like university of michigan, ann arbor, are a tremendous resource for entrepreneurs, people trying to develop new high-tech business businesses. so it is a good sign to see that america still has a powerful industrial base but it is diversifying into a wide range of new types of industries. so it is a large and complex economy. i don't know if you want to talk about the broader economy or not, but you could come back to it if you like, but you know, we have been seeing some improvement in the labor market, it's still not we would like it to be. growth has been moderate. there are some positive signs to look at, and i think one of the key positives, i made reference to, is housing. as you know, house prices in the u.s. felt about 30% and the amount of construction felt extraordinary over this recession. and now for the first time, really since 2007, 2006, we are starting to see increases in production, house prices, that will affect household wealth. that's one positive factor that's going to help us hav
CSPAN
Jan 19, 2013 4:45pm EST
billions of dollars we invest in the prison infrastructure. that gets transferred into education and then people make wise decisions. like you said, there is access to these dirty, cheap, bad drugs. people were able to get access to much more benign drugs like marijuana they might make decisions that if they had the education to know, this is actually help your choice. we might not ever get rid of drugs completely, but there are six alternatives to the worse options. >> one last question over here in the quarter for the evening and then we will have to wrap up this portion and move on to the book signing. so last question for the evening. i want to thank you. a very good presentation. i think he presented a very good case. the coca leaf is innocuous or even beneficial. however, it is true, you get cocaine from coca. cocaine is quite a, well, it is a substance for you can make a lot of money. you have the drug cartels involved in that. how can you control the growth of coca without getting the drug cartels involved and keeping it from being processed into the cocaine that can be obvio
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